be a goldfish…

I thought I would write part two of Farewell 2021 being nostalgic and looking back over my year.

I started sorting my photos, many of those memories were truly delightful. I met two brilliant & handsome 18-month-old boys (Cru, my great-nephew, and Roger, the grandson of dear friends). I also saw The Rolling Stones for the very first time.

Other memories of 2021…well, let’s just say they weren’t ALL delightful. I learned a helluva lot though.

This morning, I watched a TEDtalk Choices that can Change your Life by Caroline Myss. This got me thinking about the nature of choice, the power of language, integrity, and how I can observe my own behavior in new ways. Caroline’s TEDtalk won’t land the same for everyone, being reminded of the POWER OF CHOICE was what I needed to hear today.

“I will not pass my suffering on, but my wisdom.” —Caroline Myss

wisdom NOT woe, check…

Today, I’m making a choice to spend more time thinking about and planning my future than dwelling on my past…especially childhood bullshit. I’m 55-years-old, good grief it’s time.

I want to look forward with an expansive, heart-swelling sense of the endless possibilities that exist in the universe. This is my goal, aspirational I know and I will slip up often. Ted Lasso’s advice just might help me stay on track.

“You know what the happiest animal in the world is? It’s a goldfish. It’s got a 10-second memory.

Be a goldfish!”

—TED LASSO

In 2022 want to be more like a goldfish than an elephant.

Thank you Judith for sharing this TEDtalk. ❤️

Thank you, Caroline Myss, and the writers at Ted Lasso.

Wow, I guess the TEDs really spoke to me today.

Happy Father’s Day!

One of my favorite memories with my Dad this year was surprising him at his induction into the South Dakota High School Basketball Hall of Fame in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.  The banquet was held right around the time of the state tournaments in March.  Basketball was a really big connector for my family—both watching and playing.

I wasn’t a great player by any stretch of the imagination, but I’m sure I was better because of Dad’s coaching and shooting hoops after supper.  My Dad actually sent someone into the locker room at half time to tell me that I wasn’t getting my feet off the floor on my jump shots in a game against our rivals, Gregory.  He was right and I don’t remember exactly, but I suspect that didn’t make me jump much higher.

It was a privilege to hear all of the other high school basketball stories from around South Dakota.  We laughed, we cried and we celebrated hard work, talent and competitiveness.

So on this Father’s Day in 2017 thank you for helping create the woman I am today.  And if you don’t feel like claiming any responsibility, well that’s OK too Dad.  No harm.  No foul.