morning mind…

I woke up with a different sort of clarity than I’ve had for a while. I thought it was worth memorializing. I slept well. My energy is different. I love rainy days. I’m spending the afternoon with my daughter. I’m traveling to South Dakota to visit my family on Saturday. It’s spring. It’s trivia night at our social club. I’m alive and that simply on its own is something to be truly grateful for.

Excerpt from James Comey’s New York Times Op Ed: “You can’t say this out loud — maybe not even to your family — but in a time of emergency, with the nation led by a deeply unethical person, this will be your contribution, your personal sacrifice for America.”

It’s a curious process to see where the mind goes first thing in the morning.

I’m so guilty..

of being way too serious way too much of my day.  I started out this morning reading the New York Times and all of the crazy political news.  David Duke is back, really?  Then I landed on this piece about “cognitive closure” and it really struck me.  I was so interested in this concept that I read it to my highly disinterested 16-year-old daughter, Lucy.  My husband, Jeff kind of listened to me, but he really just wanted to work on the 1970s song “My Maria” and play his guitar while our cat, Karen watched him adoringlyClearly, I need to lighten up. Goofing off more lessens the anxiety of those around us too.  Our cat was trying to show me what to pay attention to this morning.  Oh the wisdom of Karen.

I think culturally, we just gotta lighten right now.

This political season is making us nuts.

AND YET…I still couldn’t quite help myself.  “Dr. Kruglanski is best known for his theory of “cognitive closure,” a term he coined in 1989 to describe how we make decisions. “Closure” is the moment that you make a decision or form a judgment. You literally close your mind to new information.”  By

Changing habits is hard, fun is coming—I promise.  Conceptually “cognitive closure” is something to consider, especially when you feel unable to see the options available to you and a choice needs to be made.  The middle path always allows us to see a lot more options.  But, it’s much harder to do.  Our brain wants to shut down our options.  It’s way easier than considering new information.  I told you I’m guilty of being way too serious. Good Golly, Lisa enough about cognitive closure (no matter how interesting of a psychological concept this is)…it’s time for fun.

So, after I read this piece I searched for FUN and landed on a country music video about HANGING OUT.  Here’s my gift to you today.  Thank you LITTLE BIG TOWN. You guys clearly know how to lighten up.

Back this hitch up into the water
Untie all the cables and rope
Step onto the AstroTurf
Get yourself a coozie
Let’s go

Enjoy this video, I hope your day is filled with lots of laughs and goofiness.

Watching this video reminded me that we used to hit golf balls off the front of our boat when I was in college.  Oh, we really knew how to play then.

What are we teaching our kids?

This week has been thematic for me and it started with an On Point/NPR show Monday morning while I was working in my studio.  The show was dedicated to depression, anxiety and suicide clusters among teens in America.  It highlighted the unbelievable pressure put on our teens now.  We’ve created a culture of expectation that we don’t even come close to as the standard for ourselves. We’re also living in a time when we are medicating kids at an alarming rate just to get them through all of these crazy demands. It’s unsustainable and time for a major paradigm shift.

The show highlighted both the pressure of affluent areas with a highly educated population and it discussed the suicide rate on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota (I’m a South Dakota native).  I found it quite interesting that these two populations on either side of the spectrum share something quite alarming.  Extreme pressure on one end and lack of academic pressure, rigor and opportunity on the other.  The suicide rate on the reservation among teens is 4 times the national statistic.  Devastating.

Here’s the link to the show:

http://onpoint.wbur.org/2015/05/04/teen-suicides-palo-alto-south-dakota-pressure

This got me thinking about my three teenagers (ages 19 and 15 year-old-twins) and my expectations of them. If I was held to the standard that is out there culturally for them I don’t think I would get out of bed.  I want to create an environment that allows a lot of time for discussion about character…there will be resistance but they just might thank me later…maybe in their late 20s.  This photo was the day my girls said goodbye to their college bound big brother.

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Here’s what we’re expecting of our teens:

• Have perfect grades in every subject (not just the classes that really interest them or what courses they possess natural ability).  I basically majored in English in High School.

• Be good athletes (often whether they enjoy the sport or not).

• Be fit and attractive (to take gorgeous selfies).

• Be so passionate about something and develop expertise—distinguishing themselves among their peers.  (This is rare and why we hear these stores on 60 minutes.)

• Play an instrument, a talented vocalist or an actor.

• Volunteer and be dedicated community servants (looks great on college applications).

• Know what career they want (this is crazy to be asking kids—they don’t know about all possibilities out there, let alone should they be expected to share with the world their intentions).

In sixth grade we were suppose to draw a picture of the profession we desired and cut the face out inserting one of our wallet-sized school photos.  I thought it was crazy then and much to my mother and teacher’s chagrin I drew a Skid Row sort of bum.  Sorry, Mrs. Tolstedt and Mom.  My drawing did, however exhibit my artistic ability and smart-ass inclinations (which have mostly served me quite well in my adult life). My drawing was my image in fingerless gloves, a black bowler hat and a bottle in a brown paper bag.  I wish I had it to show you.

I am oddly proud of that drawing because I didn’t know then and still don’t entirely know now what I want to “BE”…and it’s OK.

This morning the other information that popped onto my radar is New York columnist/author, David Brooks’ new book, “The Road to Character”.  His book is about development of our inner lives in a era of heightened competition, sound bites & selfies.

What if our expectations & conversations with our teens focused on their inner lives, manners, kindness, generosity, purpose & empathy?

You can subscribe to David Brooks’ website and become a part of the discussion.

http://theroadtocharacter.com/

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Here is an excerpt from the book.

the road to character

I would love to hear your thoughts on this topic.  Please leave comments.

Best,

Lisa sig

I thought I would go clean the studio today, however…

I think I will just go and be innovative and creative.

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From the article…
“…people greatly preferred convention in the tidy room and novelty in the messy room. ”

Great New York Times article by KATHLEEN D. VOHS regarding the studies around messy and tidy work environments.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/15/opinion/sunday/its-not-mess-its-creativity.html?_r=0

Gabriel Axel—Babette’s Feast Director

Mr. Axel Babette's Feast Lillibridge

Gabriel Axel, a director whose 1987 labor of love, “Babette’s Feast,” received the first foreign-language Oscar awarded to a Danish motion picture — and heralded a growing popular interest in all things food — died on Sunday (February 9th) in Copenhagen. He was 95.

Thank you & Farewell Mr. Axel, Babette’s feast is one of the absolute movie delights of my lifetime. I want to see it with my children.

Here is the link to his NYTimes obituary:
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/13/movies/gabriel-axel-director-of-babettes-feast-dies-at-95.html?_r=0

A few of the things the NYtimes taught me today.

christopher wool, lillibridge
This painting, created in 1988 by artist Christopher Wool titled “Apocalypse Now” is estimated to be worth between 15 and 20 million. What a crazy world we live in. Although, I kind of think the message of the painting is appealing.

katniss sweater, lillibridge
LA knitting designer Maria Dora designed this for Katniss Everdeen (Hunger Games). It is meant to show that she has a heart at home but needs to fit into the fashionable world of the Capitol. I would guess a lot of these will be knit after the movie comes out on the 22nd.

Lillibridge, NYtimes, attractive candidates
You think of attractive political candidates as gaining votes by the “halo effect”. It turns out that it might be linked to ancient adaptations for avoiding disease. In districts with high levels of disease and unhealthy populations— healthy, attractive candidate had a much easier time at the ballot box. Interesting huh?

hair on inside, lillibridge
Apparently I’ve been looking like a fool for a very long time wearing my hair on the outside of my necklaces. I feel like such a fashion DON’T. Why didn’t anyone say anything?