women of elegant power…

I have my own thoughts about the stories of these women. However, I want you to use your own imaginations. What we see is so subjective based on our own experience.

I will offer this though, from my perspective, they are not hiding.

“Maybe I see things from a little bit farther away—which is a good thing. If you’re an artist, you see things differently than most people anyway.” —Nicole Farhi, London Sculptor

I created this work by painting over magazine images, photographing them with objects, and then playing in Adobe Photoshop. They’re all from the pages of Vogue and Kinfolk (Nicole Farhi is pictured in the striped shirt). I found beauty, narrative, and true artistry in the gorgeous original magazine images, of course. However, when I look beneath the surface of the subjects and models there’s far more than meets the eye at first glance.

Have fun making up your own stories about these women & please challenge your initial assumptions. I had far more fun when I dug a little deeper and noticed my quick judgments & hard-wired biases.

north country girls…

Please see for me that her hair is hanging long
For that’s the way I remember her the best.
—Bob Dylan

And when you go, and the snow flakes fall
The rivers freeze, and summer ends
Please see for me, that she’s wearing a coat so warm
Keep her from… that howling wind. —Bob Dylan

city girls…

Thank you fashion photographers, Vogue, Jessica Chastain, and Cara Delevingne.

creative joy & unabashed thievery

“Nothing is original. Steal from anywhere that resonates with inspiration or fuels your imagination. Devour old films, new films, music, books, paintings, photographs, poems, dreams, random conversations, architecture, bridges, street signs, trees, clouds, bodies of water, light and shadows. Select only things to steal from that speak directly to your soul. If you do this, your work (and theft) will be authentic. Authenticity is invaluable; originality is non-existent. And don’t bother concealing your thievery – celebrate it if you feel like it. In any case, always remember what Jean-Luc Godard said: “It’s not where you take things from – it’s where you take them to.” —Jim Jarmusch, filmmaker

Lisa Lillibridge
Lisa Lillibridge

I haven’t felt very painterly lately, so I thought I would give myself an hour to just play in my studio. I ripped out a bunch of magazine ads I loved from a Harper’s I found under one of my daughter’s beds, tore, painted, searched for found objects and photographed. It’s always resonated with me creatively the statement; it’s not where you take things from, it’s where you take them to. I might become a little obsessive about this process for a while. I’m just letting you know.

Thank you Harper’s Bazaar, fashion photographers, art directors, editors, models, designers, stylists, lighting desigers, location scouts, caterers, personal assistants…and everyone else involved in the shots I stole. Your eye and ideas are inspirational, even if I’m not always wild about the body image messaging or the products.