the past, the future & the neglected now.

This week I read that forgiveness will only occur when we recognize that we can no longer change our past.  That’s a relatively simple concept.  I’m able to intellectually grasp it and yet…why am I wasting time with would of, could of & should of thoughts?  If thinking about my past can give me the blues and worrying about the future causes anxiety, why am I doing it?  I don’t have to feel this way.  I have a choice.

My past is my life’s circumstance.

I cannot possibly change one thing.

My future is uncertain.

The only certainty is that my life will contain both joy & some devastating heartbreak.

 I’m neglecting my NOW.

What can I do?

I tried saying to myself what I’m doing at any given moment.

“I’m calling the dentist now.”

“I’m watching a video my daughter wants to share with me.”

“I’m checking my email now.”

“I’m listening to (insert the name of everyone you encounter) now.”

You know what?  This really helps.  It slows time down and reminds me that I’m doing this one thing right now.  When I practice this, I feel more in control and less manipulated by those lousy would of, could of & should of thoughts.

“Realize deeply that the present moment is all you ever have.”

—Eckhart Tolle

 

It seems damn near revolutionary to try to be more present is our distracted world. 

I’m going to try.

 

 

It’s all in perspective.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I was working in my studio yesterday on deadline for a big project on deadline (September 6th-YIKES) and I had this realization. Sometimes life looks so daunting if you look through a big scope. When I narrowed the way I was seeing what needed to be done, it really settled my nervous system down. I took these photos of the same sculpture in Milwaukee last week. What a difference leaning down a bit made in my perspective.

“The Calling” is a sculpture by American artist Mark di Suvero in O’Donnell Park, which is on the lakefront in Milwaukee across a footbridge to the Milwaukee Art Museum.